Wednesday, August 25, 2010

Frozen Shoulder affects women more than men.....

Great article about frozen shoulder. It is always recommended that you first try a good, well rounded frozen shoulder elimination program before surgery.

Overall, frozen shoulder affects about 20 percent of people with diabetes, compared with 5 percent of people without diabetes.

Other risk factors are gender and age. Women are more likely to develop frozen shoulder than men, and frozen shoulder occurs most frequently in people between the ages of 40 and 60. It usually affects only one shoulder at a time, and for reasons unknown, the non-dominant shoulder is affected most often.

Monday, August 23, 2010

Frozen Shoulder Treatment

Frozen Shoulder therapy is often centered on pain relief (see below excerpt from Noël E et al).

Pain relief is the main objective of therapy. Oral medications have not been adequately evaluated, with the exception of glucocorticoids, which hasten the resolution of nighttime pain to a modest degree....Motion range recovery is not always complete after 18 to 24 months and can be improved by physiotherapy. Methodological difficulties have precluded demonstration in formal studies of the undeniable benefits of physiotherapy.

I find that you can get a lot of pain relief from some good soft tissue work (a.k.a. Poor Man's Massage). That is the basis of my almost famous frozen shoulder tennis ball trick.

Thursday, August 19, 2010

Stop the Pain


I have written a lot lately about dealing with physical pain.


I believe without a doubt that most physical pain can be dealt with, and abolished just by incorporating a few key exercises into your daily routine.


I do realize that is a controversial statement to make…especially if you are someone that has to deal with intense pain daily.


I can only make that statement because I have helped hundreds of people over the last 18 years effectively deal with their physical problems and rid themselves of pain. With that said, I am not ignorant enough to say that I know how to get rid of any and all pain. However, I do think that all situations can get better by doing the right things.


Last week I had a client email me to cancel her training session because of back problems. Instead “waiting” for the problem to just go away, as she was planning on doing, I asked her to come in anyway.


She came in that night and within 15 minutes of working with her, the majority of her pain was gone.


Not everyone has access to a professional that can effectively deal with physical problems and pain. More so, many people just don’t have the time to “wait it out” or go through countless sessions of therapy just to get some minor relief.


So what can you do if you live with physical pain?


Here are 5 things, that you can do at home, or in your gym to help correct your issues and help lessen some or all of your pain.


  1. Stretch your hips each and everyday. Your hips hold the key to a healthy lower back, and strong, pain free knees. Keeping the hips mobile and flexible is one piece to this pain puzzle.
  2. Strengthen your glutes! I would venture to say that 98% of people that I have dealt with in the last 18 years have had weak, inactivated glute muscles. Yes, the glutes are your butt. Most of us sit all day, and that shuts our glutes off, and by doing so, puts the low back and knees in a bad spot.
  3.  Add more pulling motions into your upper body workouts. Things like rows, pull-ups, chin-ups and pull downs are great ways to help keep your shoulder complex healthy and pain free.
    • Check out a video I just did explaining how to keep your shoulders healthy…here
  4. Avoid a lot of pushing motions like bench press, over head pressing and dips until you get your shoulder feeling right again.
  5. Don’t forget to work the rotator cuff. It is more important than most people think. Don’t just wait until you have an injury.